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Deftones – Gore Album Review

Photo of Deftones Gore

Deftones Gore

Beautiful, heavy, and experimental: These three words best describe Gore, the latest release from alternative metal/experimental rock group Deftones. Of the many shifts the band has taken since 1988, Gore is perhaps the most significant, blending the aggression of down-tuned guitar riffs with an added emphasis on melody and ambience.

Frontman Chino Moreno, the biggest driving force behind this change, uses this mix to show how versatile his vocals can be. From the mellow sounds of “Hearts/Wires” to the brute aggression behind “Doomed User,” it’s clear that his vocals suit both heavier and softer music.

Photo of Deftones Gore

Deftones

Many bands struggle to create cohesion in an album full of diversity and experimentation, but the members of Deftones show that it’s not the case on Gore. Even on a track like “Prayers/Triangles,” which contains everything from atmospheric verses to screamed vocals, the band finds a way to make it all sound natural.

In an interview with Noisey, Vice’s music channel,Chino explains the writing process for the album.

“We try to hold each other and ourselves accountable for trying to expand. The fact that everybody speaks their minds and gives their honest opinion really helps push each other to see how far we can take things and make it an organic experience.”

Deftones were never a band to make music to please radio stations or play it safe, but Gore stands out as polarizing due to the emphasis on melody

Deftones were never a band to make music to please radio stations or play it safe, but Gore stands out as polarizing due to the emphasis on melody. They took the risk, knowing it wouldn’t be easy for some fans to digest. Even guitarist Stephen Carpenter took a while to adjust to the album’s eclectic array of sounds. Despite the creative disagreements that sometimes come up between members of the band, Deftones continue to evolve with Gore.